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Social, political and economic transformation in the developing world
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    About the MSc Development Management Development Management views the comparative statics and comparative dynamics of development through the lens of institutions and organisations. The comparative statics of development are – why are some countries rich and some countries poor at any given moment in time, like a snapshot? Comparative dynamics are the process of getting richer and freer and more […]

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    I’m currently visiting Bolivia for the LACEA 2015 conference, and also giving a series of lectures in La Paz and Santa Cruz associated with my new book. I first lived here in the mid-1990s, and got to know the country well. Bolivia is transformed since then; the changes are breathtaking. The country is vastly richer, its political establishment has been […]

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    Colombia is not a “typical” Latin American country. It diverges from common views of the region in ways that are interesting and important. It has a deep democratic vocation, lacking the coups and dictatorships common elsewhere. Its one military coup was peaceful and initially enjoyed broad support from the political establishment. (Originally published in The Cipher Brief.) Colombia has an […]

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    In our latest blog series International Development Professor Jean-Paul Faguet wants to know your thoughts on the subject of “Should lecture notes be circulated in advance?” Every year my MSc Development Management students ask for lecture notes to be circulated in advance. Every year I decline, waving my hands and invoking vague dangers. This year’s group – a particularly energetic bunch […]

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    As I mentioned in yesterday’s post, students are once again requesting that lecture notes be circulated in advance, something I have always resisted. Here is an attempt to explain (not least to myself) why I find this objectionable. What exactly do you have when you have ‘the lecture notes’? I must admit to a feeling of mystery about why students […]

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    Continuing with our blog series “The Great Lecture Notes Debate” we hear from LSE International Development lecturers on why they think it’s a good idea Teddy Brett – Professor of International Development I think that a strong case can be made for pre-circulating lecture notes, and have done so whenever I have completed them in time to do so. I am […]

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    LSE International Development students have their say on “The Great Lecture Notes Debate”: Xu Gong – MSc in Development Studies. For me, pre-circulated notes may reduce my motivation to finish all required readings before lectures. I took history classes at the LSE when I was an undergraduate, notes were always posted on Moodle before lectures. I sometimes skipped readings after […]

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    This Wednesday (2 December) we’re launching a new book “Is Decentralization Good for Development?” at the LSE (6:30pm, Hong Kong Theatre). This is a public panel discussion so all interested are warmly invited to join! Ahead of this the book’s author Professor Jean-Paul Faguet gives us a preview of the argument put forward in the book. Over the past few weeks, many people […]

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    As part of the ongoing “Great Lecture Notes Debate” we hear from Dr Colleen McKenna, Departmental Adviser to the Department of International Development in the LSE Teaching and Learning Centre. Colleen has explored the educational research on how different approaches to handouts stimulate student engagement in lectures and are thought to support student learning and achievement.   I have enjoyed the rich […]

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    This week LSE academic developer Dr Colleen McKenna reported on The Great Lecture Notes Debate for the LSE Teaching Blog, summarising the arguments and speaking to Professor Jean-Paul Faguet about what happens next. At the end of last term, Professor Jean-Paul Faguet initiated The Great Lecture Notes Debate on the International Development blog. The debate was framed by the question ‘Should lecture notes be circulated […]

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  • 09/01/16--04:16: The Democracy Bomb
  • As the UK government continues negotiations on the country’s exit from the European Union, Professor Jean-Paul Faguet considers what the EU Referendum result has revealed about democracy in the UK. The Brexit vote may look like the bomb that blew up British politics, aborting the careers of David Cameron, George Osborne, and all the main Brexit leaders. But rest assured, the reality […]

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    Professor Jean-Paul Faguet, Programme Co-Director for Development Management, tells us what he has been up to during his sabbatical. Hello and happy new year from Los Andes! I visited the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill for a month this past Oct-Nov, where I revised “The Paradox of Land Reform, Inequality and Development in Colombia” and presented to their comparative […]

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    In his latest article for Social Europe, Professor of the Political Economy of Development, Jean-Paul Faguet, compares two of the largest democratically voted referendas of 2016 and explains how, despite being fought under similar conditions, outcomes for both were exceptionally different. A Spanish version of this article is available here. Last year served up two extraordinary referenda, fought under similar […]

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    Professor Faguet explains why political economy research on Latin America is on the verge of a major breakthrough, based on deep collaborations between historians, political scientists, economists and scientists further afield, exploring the drivers of divergent development patterns over not decades, but centuries and even millennia. Why are some countries rich and others poor? Why did some countries, like the UK and France, […]

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    To celebrate the Spanish-language launch of Professor Jean-Paul Faguet’s book Popular Democracy: Governance from Below in Bolivia, we will be publishing the first chapter of the book as part of a five part series over the coming month. You can read our post about the book launches in Bolivia here. Part 1/5 It must be more-or-less obvious that a department […]

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    To celebrate the Spanish-language launch of Professor Jean-Paul Faguet’s book Popular Democracy: Governance from Below in Bolivia, we will be publishing the first chapter of the book as part of a five part series over the coming month. You can read our post about the book launches in Bolivia here. In case you have missed it, you can read part […]